Harold Best: “Even the good works of an unbeliever, which are admittedly considerable and varied, fall easily in line with their evil ones.”

Even the good works of an unbeliever, which are admittedly considerable and varied, fall easily in line with their evil ones, since their reason for doing either are driven by the same underlying falsity: the works are effective in themselves. Unbelievers not only can separate their “mistakes” from their good deeds, but also they believe that a sufficient number of the latter can offset or compensate for the former. Moralizing, when it does occur, does not take account of the fact that even the most altruistic work is still sin-tinged and in need of cleansing. Evil is seen episodically and self-referenced for what it is at the time, rather than as a part of a comprehensive condition that simultaneously infects even the good works.

Harold Best, Unceasing Worship: Biblical Perspectives on Worship and the Arts, 78

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About cteldridge

A beggar trying to tell other beggars were the Bread is.
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