David Wells comparing the conversions of the Apostle Paul and that of children

Paul and children, Wells claims, are both in the pattern of what he calls “insider conversion”. He explains why:

Paul’s conversion fell into this pattern [of insider conversion] because of what he already knew: his profound knowledge of the Old Testament Scriptures, his training in Judaism, his zealous acceptance of many of the truths without which there can be no gospel. Paul already believed in the one God, accepted biblical revelation, understood its teaching on sin and the need for sacrifice, believed in God’s judgment, and in some way anticipated a Messiah. This was not a small foundation upon which the gospel could rest! For children the pattern of coming to Christ is similar, not because they bring with them this set of beliefs, but because they need to have them built up as a preparation for the gospel. They need to come into saving faith by incremental stages, making steps toward Christ as their knowledge of biblical truth grows and as their awareness of themselves as sinners increases. It is important to build this foundation with patience and care and to resist the temptation to produce instant conversions. Young children often want to please parents and adults and it is therefore not difficult for teachers and evangelists to manipulate them into making a decision. But even if this is done with the best of motives, it is not the best, or even a desired, result. For what results is a misunderstood experience that later on may rebound in the form of a bitter resentment and disillusionment.

David Wells, Turning to God: Reclaiming Christian Conversion as Unique, Neccessary, and Supernatural, p. 67-68

Advertisements

About cteldridge

A beggar trying to tell other beggars were the Bread is.
This entry was posted in Conversion, Evangelism, Gospel, Salvation. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s